City Girl Adventure: Boston Ballet’s The Nutcracker

When you’re a little ballerina-in-the-making, your first audition doesn’t seem like a big deal. But then you get there, swoop your hair into a tight bun on the top of your head, pull on your fresh pink ballet tights and your stomach does a flip-flop as the older ballerinas rush by you as they practically race to the studio for their chance to dance their dream roles. In short, there are fewer things more magical than being a part of The Nutcracker, whether you’re on the stage or watching it.

While visions of sugar plums danced in their heads...
While visions of sugar plums danced in their heads…

On Friday, I had a chance to watch my favorite ballet company make my childhood memories come to life again.

Keep reading to be a part of my exclusive experience with the Boston Ballet!

Christmas trees, potato pancakes, snow…some things are instant reminders of holiday seasons gone by. Or, in this case, memories to come. On Friday, I was invited to attend the Boston Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker and let’s just say that a lot has changed since I danced the part of a cherub at Walnut Hill.

Is the set not absolutely magical?!
Is the set not absolutely magical?!

For those of you who have known me for years, you know that I have several years of Nutcracker performances under my belt. From third grade until sophomore year of high school, I have danced the part of a baby angel, a toy soldier, a coffee-Arabian, and a party child (see Act I). There are fewer things more magical than being a part of this timeless holiday tradition…except for watching it in one of the most majestic venues of course!

Childhood dreams coming true!
Childhood dreams coming true!

From now until December 31st, over 100 dancers will delight audiences at the Boston Opera House in early 19th century Regency style costumes (also identified with the “Jane Austen period”) in over 2,000 yards of net and tulle. Over 200,000 jewels (from 3mm to 18 mm in size) sparkle on stage, many of which are hand sewn. The magical Christmas tree, which infamously grows towards the end of the first act, is 42 ½ feet and decorated with 600 ornaments. In other words, calling this show “magical” is an understatement.

My sneak peek at Clara's crown under the prop table backstage.
My sneak peek at Clara’s crown under the prop table backstage.

If you think all of that is impressive, consider the fact that the dancers have, at most, one month to rehearse before the curtain goes up on opening night. Many of the ballerinas just came off a stint with Swan Lake which means they have had anywhere between a week to a half hour (yes, you read that right), to practice their choreography. (So what’s your excuse?)

Spoiler alert: This is what the exquisite  inside of the Boston Opera House looks like.
Spoiler alert: This is what the exquisite inside of the Boston Opera House looks like.

My experience on Friday night included a glass of champagne in the V.I.P. Lounge with two dancers from the Snow Scene during the break at intermission (see above). Following the show, I went backstage to sneak a peek at many of the props and pieces used in the show. Check out my gallery below for more behind-the-scenes from the show & my night on the town:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

For more on what I’m reading, some gift-spiration & wearing, follow me on Bloglovin’, Facebook & Foursquare!

xo, Vanessa

Many thanks to; Thread Communications for inviting me to the show & the Boston Ballet for providing an absolutely magical evening!

This post is inspired by:

Dylan's Candy Bar

Advertisements

Published by

Vanessa M. Gatlin

-Blogger, dancer, fashionista -Self proclaimed "political junkie" with a strong interest in international affairs -2011 graduate of Emmanuel College in Boston

4 thoughts on “City Girl Adventure: Boston Ballet’s The Nutcracker”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s